How to Handle Buying Objections

April 17th 2012       Sally Ormond       copywriter, copywriting tips, handling buying objections

In an ideal world, when selling to your customers, the process would go something this this:

You – This stereo is the latest thing onth market. It blows its competition out of the water. Every house in the UK will own one soon so make sure you’re the innovator in your street and buy yours today.

Prospect – Fantastic, I’ll have one!

The problem is, life just isn’t like that. No one can be sold to that easily (well, very few people). Normally, you’ll experience something more like  this:

You – This stereo is the latest thing onth market. It blows its competition out of the water. Every house in the UK will own one soon so make sure you’re the innovator in your street and buy yours today.

Prospect – It’s quite expensive.

You – But it’s the latest technology.

Prospect – Hmmm, not sure I really need all those features.

You – But it’s cutting-edge.

Prospect – Hmm, think I’d better ask the wife.

You – But…wait…its great…hang on…come back!!!!

In the world of copywriting, writing great copy isn’t just about getting your customers to say yes, it’s also about stopping them from saying no.

So when you’re with your client to take their brief for your next assignment, don’t just focus on the benefits, also take the time to find out why a customer may not believe your magic words and say no.

Yes, but…

When you’re stood in front of a customers, teh last thing you want to hear is “Yes, but….” because it means they are not convinced and you could lose them any second. But at least if you’re in front of them, you stand a chance of overcoming their objections.

When selling through copy, that’s not an option – your copywriting has to address their fears and wash them away

Common objections

The 3 most common objections are:

  •  It’s too expensive
  • I need to talk to someone else
  • I don’t really need it

Let’s look at each in turn.

Too expensive

Although one of the most popular reasons, it’s seldom the reason for not buying – it’s just an easy one to target.

To get round it, you must demonstrate the value of the product to your reader – show them it will actually save them money. The best way to do this is to refer to it as an investment. It sounds a bit grander than ‘cost’ and it implies there will be a payback of some sort.

Talk to someone else

Again, another little white lie that’s a nice let-out from having to make a buying decision.

This one implies they’re not convinced by your product so you can counter that through your copy with testimonials and case studies. These real life examples will give them the reassurance they need.

Don’t think I need it

If this one crops up it means your copy hasn’t done its job because it’s not ‘sold’ the idea.

There’s only one thing to do, go back to the drawing board. Take a look at your copy – have you told a story? Did you cover all the benefits? Did you explain how your reader will benefit (with facts)?

Also, go back to the product/service and find out exactly what it does for the reader – not its functions and features, its actual benefits; how it will make your readers’ lives better.

Over to you

There will always be objections to overcome so make sure you list every potential objection before you start writing your copy.

If you can dispel those doubts you are much closer to getting the sales you (and your client) want.

What other objections have you come across and how did you overcome them? Leave a comment below and share your experiences

Tags: copywriter, copywriting tips, handling buying objections
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